More Resources

Over the years I gathered and have written some resources for early-career astronomers. Below is a list/overview of several of them. Feel free to share with anyone who might benefit from this. I welcome suggestions or questions.

News:

Big news! I’m thrilled to share that we are organizing an session on “Early Career Astronomers & their supporters” on June 28th 2021 during the EAS conference. Check out this website for more information: https://eas.unige.ch/EAS2021/session.jsp?id=SS34

Academic writing/reading: 

Mental Health resources

  • for graduate students from astrobites https://astrobites.org/2019/08/23/mental-health-in-grad-school/?fbclid=IwAR2v0-HWl6MUcY3VPGZ5gfB_3Ihv2Cf99FfXerSliSrkZXd5o0Z9CWFFRqk 
  • Posters on mental health by Zoe J Ayres https://www.zjayres.com/posters?fbclid=IwAR3nCmR6iT0bgHGccN9dYkm9YwxONKNFXdhTFlAmvTJLRSvSV322qPisVvQ

Applying to PhD/PostDocs/summer schools resources: 

Mentoring resources:

Mentors are a vital ingredient for supporting the research career, particularly for early-career astronomers. Below are some of my favorite resources on mentoring, which touch on both how to find mentors, how to create valuable mentor relationships as well as how to be a mentor. 

 

 
 
My own mentoring philosophy is heavily based on the documents described above, as well as my own experiences and several trainings I took over the past years. In my mentoring role I work from the following 3 core principles: (1) I try to make sure I adopt to my mentees needs, which likely evolve over time (2) I discuss (mentee/mentor) expectations early on and make them explicit (e.g. I have a “mentor/mentee” agreement document that I share with my mentees)  and (3) I connect my mentee with a broad support/mentor network early on, e.g. by actively connecting them with other astronomers.  

More resources: